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Explore Manchester

Manchester is a city and metropolitan area in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 530,300 in 2015. It is the second largest populated urban area in the UK with a population of 2.8 million. Manchester is fringed by the Cheshire plain to the south, the pennines to the north and east, and an arc of cities with which it forms a continuous metropolitan area. The local authority is the city council of Manchester. The recorded history of Manchester began with the civilian settlement associated with the Roman fort of Mamucium or Mancunium, which was founded around 79 AD on a sandstone cliff near the confluence of the Medlock and Irwell Rivers. It was historically part of Lancashire, though areas of Cheshire were merged south of the River Mersey in the 20th century.

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National Football Museum

Urbis, Manchester M4 3BG, UK
The National Football Museum is England's National Museum of Football. Located in the Urbis Building in Manchester city center, it preserves, preserves and displays important collections of football memorabilia. As a publicly funded National Museum, admission is free. The museum was originally in Deepdale, Preston, Lancashire, but moved in 2012 to Manchester.
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Museum of Science and Industry

Liverpool Road, Manchester, M3 4FP, UK
The Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, England, is a large museum dedicated to the development of science, technology and industry, with a focus on the achievements of the city in these areas. The museum is part of the Science Museum Group, a non-departmental public institution of the Department of Culture, Media and Sports, which was merged in 2012 with the National Science Museum. There are extensive exhibitions on transport, electricity, Manchester's sewage and sanitation, textiles, communications and computers. The museum is an anchor point of the European Route of Industrial Heritage; It is located on the grounds of the world's first train station - Manchester Liverpool Road - which opened in September 1830 as part of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The station front and the warehouse from 1830 are both listed buildings. The museum also offers steam train rides on weekends and public holidays.
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The Manchester Museum

Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
Manchester Museum is a museum with works of archeology, anthropology and natural history and is owned by the University of Manchester in England. Located on Oxford Road in the heart of the University's neo-Gothic buildings, it offers access to around 4.5 million objects from every continent. It is Britain's largest university museum and serves as both a major attraction for visitors and a resource for academic research and teaching. It has about 430,000 visitors a year.
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Manchester Art Gallery

Mosley Street, M2 3JL, Manchester
Manchester Art Gallery, formerly Manchester City Art Gallery, is a public art museum on Mosley Street in Manchester city center. The main building of the gallery was built in 1823 for a learned society and today its collection includes three interconnected buildings, two of which were designed by Sir Charles Barry. Both Barry buildings are listed. The building that connects them was designed by Hopkins Architects following an architectural competition run by RIBA Competitions. It was opened in 2002 after an extensive renovation and expansion project at the Art Gallery. The Manchester Art Gallery can be entered and opened seven days a week. It houses many works of local and international importance and has a collection of more than 25,000 objects. More than half a million people visited the museum over a one-year period, according to figures released in April 2014.
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People's History Museum

Bridge Street, Manchester
The People's History Museum in Manchester, England, is the United Kingdom's national centre for the collection, conservation, interpretation and study of material relating to the history of working people in the UK. It is located in a grade II-listed, former hydraulic pumping station on the corner of the Bridge Street and Water Street designed by Manchester Corporation City Architect, Henry Price.The museum tells the story of the history of democracy in Great Britain and about people's lives at home, work and leisure over the last 200 years. The collection contains printed material, physical objects and photographs of people at work, rest and play. Some of the topics covered include popular radicalism, the Peterloo Massacre, 19th century trade unionism, the women's suffrage movement, dockers, the cooperative movement, the 1945 general election, and football. It also includes material relating to friendly societies, the welfare movement and advances in the lives of working people.
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Police Museum

57a Newton Street, Manchester, M1 1ET, UK
A hidden gem. Devoted to work of the police back in Victorian times, when it was much more exciting. Definitely visit.
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Fletcher Moss Park & Botanical Gardens

Fletcher Moss Botanical Garden is situated in Didsbury, Manchester, England, between the River Mersey and Stenner Woods. The park is named after local Alderman Fletcher Moss, who donated the park to the city of Manchester in 1915. It is part botanical garden and part wildlife habitat, but also offers recreational facilities such as recently refurbished tennis courts, rugby and football pitches, and a family-run café.
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Whitworth Art Gallery

Oxford Road, M15 6ER, Manchester
The Whitworth is an art gallery in Manchester, England, containing about 55,000 items in its collection. The gallery is located in Whitworth Park and is part of the University of Manchester. In 2015, the Whitworth reopened after it was transformed by a £15 million capital redevelopment that doubled its exhibition spaces, restored period features and opened itself up to its surrounding park. The gallery received more than 440,000 visitors in its first year and was awarded the Art Fund’s Museum of the Year prize in 2015.In June 2017, Maria Balshaw stepped down as the director to take up her new role as the Director of Tate. Nick Merriman is acting Interim Director of the Whitworth.
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HOME

2 Tony Wilson Place, First Street, Manchester, M15 4FN, UK
Lovers of art, theatre and film will love this place. Two performance venues and a gallery make this place a must if you're an arts enthusiast.
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Sports

Etihad Stadium

Joe Mercer Way, M11 3FF, Manchester, GB
The City of Manchester Stadium in Manchester, England, also known as Etihad Stadium for sponsorship, is home to the Manchester City Football Club and has a national football capacity of 55,097, the fourth largest in the Premier League and the eighth largest in the UK The stadium was hosted in 2008 as the venue for the 2008 UEFA Cup final, the English national teams, the rugby league, the boxing match and the last match of the English Rugby Union 2015. Cup and summer music concerts during the football off-season. The stadium, originally proposed as an athletics arena in Manchester's bid for the 2000 Summer Olympics, was converted from an arena of 38,000 seats to a 48,000-seat football stadium by 22 million pounds and Manchester City by £ 20 million after the 2002 Commonwealth Games.
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Heaton Park

Heaton Park is a municipal park in Manchester, England, covering an area of over 600 acres. The park includes the grounds of a Grade I listed, neoclassical 18th century country house, Heaton Hall. The hall, remodelled by James Wyatt in 1772, is now only open to the public on an occasional basis as a museum and events venue.Heaton Park was sold to Manchester City Council in 1902 by the Earl of Wilton. It has one of the United Kingdom's few concrete towers, the Heaton Park BT Tower. The park was renovated as part of a millennium project partnership between the Heritage Lottery Fund and Manchester City Council at a cost of over £10 million. It contains an 18-hole golf course, a boating lake, an animal farm, a pitch and putt course, a golf driving range, woodlands, ornamental gardens, an observatory, an adventure playground, a Papal monument and a volunteer-run tram system and museum, and is listed Grade II by Historic England.
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Phones 4u Arena

Victoria Station, Manchester, M3 1AR, UK
The Manchester Arena is an indoor arena in Manchester, England, immediately north of the city centre and partly above Manchester Victoria station in air rights space. The arena has the highest seating capacity of any indoor venue in the United Kingdom, and second largest in the European Union with a capacity of 21,000 and is one of the world's busiest indoor arenas, hosting music and sporting events such as boxing and swimming. The arena was a key part of Manchester's bids to host the Olympic Games in 1996 and 2000 and was eventually used for the 2002 Commonwealth Games. The arena was temporarily closed following a terrorist attack by a suicide bomber on 22 May 2017, in which a suicide bomber killed 22 people and injured 500 more at the end of Ariana Grande's Dangerous Woman Tour.
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Sport City

Manchester's sport district with several venues for various sports. Hosted the 2002 Commonwealth games.
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Platt Fields

Platt Fields Park is a large public park in Fallowfield, Manchester, England which is home to Platt Hall. Fallowfield lies to the south and Wilmslow Road runs along its eastern edge.
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Manchester Arena

Hunts Bank, M3 1AR, Manchester
The Manchester Arena is an indoor arena in Manchester, England, immediately north of the city centre and partly above Manchester Victoria station in air rights space. The arena has the highest seating capacity of any indoor venue in the United Kingdom, and second largest in the European Union with a capacity of 21,000 and is one of the world's busiest indoor arenas, hosting music and sporting events such as boxing and swimming. The arena was a key part of Manchester's bids to host the Olympic Games in 1996 and 2000 and was eventually used for the 2002 Commonwealth Games. The arena was temporarily closed following a terrorist attack by a suicide bomber on 22 May 2017, in which a suicide bomber killed 22 people and injured 500 more at the end of Ariana Grande's Dangerous Woman Tour.
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Restaraunts

Oldham Street

Oldham Street is located in Manchester city center and is part of the historic Northern Quarter. The northern quarter is dominated by buildings built before the Second World War. The road goes from Piccadilly to Great Ancoats Street on the outskirts of Ancoats, beyond that goes north as Oldham Road, the A62. The road is part of Manchester, which is on a temporary list as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Methodist main hall stands on the east side.
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Hard Rock Cafe

Exchange Square, Manchester M4 2BS, UK
World-renowned theme restaurant with energetic American atmosphere serving all the classics from succulent burgers to savory salads. This is the largest in the UK, doubles as a live music venue!
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Curry Mile

Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M14, UK
The Curry Mile is a nickname for the part of Wilmslow Road running through the centre of Rusholme in south Manchester, England. The name is earned from the large number of restaurants, take-aways and kebab houses specialising in the cuisines of South Asia and the Middle East, thought to be the largest concentration of South Asian restaurants outside the Indian subcontinent.Within a length of half a mile there are least seventy establishments of this kind. The Curry Mile is notable for its streets being busy into the early hours of the morning. The area is frequently visited by local students, because of its location near the Oxford Road and Fallowfield Campuses of the University of Manchester, and the Oxford Road/All Saints campus of the Manchester Metropolitan University.
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Marble Arch Inn

73 Rochdale Road, Manchester, M4 4HY, UK
The main outlet of the city centre's only ale brewery. Also serves limited food. Has a long tradition - do not miss.
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Mr. Thomas' Chop House

52 Cross Street, Manchester, M2 7AR, UK
Very fancy and stylish Victorian restaurant with amazing interior. Traditional British cuisine.
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Going Out

Royal Exchange Theatre

St Ann’s Square, Manchester M2 7DH, UK
The Royal Exchange is a Grade II listed building in Manchester, England. It is located in the city center in the countryside bordered by St. Ann's Square, Exchange Street, Market Street, Cross Street and Old Bank Street. The complex includes the Royal Exchange Theater and the Royal Exchange Shopping Center. The Royal Exchange was severely damaged in the Manchester Blitz and Manchester Bombardment of 1996. The current building is the last of several buildings on the site used for the exchange of goods mainly, but not exclusively, cotton and textiles.
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The Village

Canal Street, the center of Manchester Gay Village, is a street in the city center of Manchester in northwest England. The pedestrian street, which runs along the west side of the Rochdale Canal, is lined with gay bars and restaurants. At night and during the warmer months, the street is packed with visitors, often with gay and lesbian tourists from all over the world. The northern end of the road meets Minshull Street and the south meets Princess Street; Part of the road looks over the Rochdale Canal into Sackville Park.
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Cloud 23

Beetham Tower, 303 Deansgate, Manchester M3 4LQ, UK
Beetham Tower is a landmark 47-storey mixed use skyscraper in Manchester, England. Completed in 2006, it is named after its developers, the Beetham Organisation, and was designed by SimpsonHaugh and Partners. The development occupies a sliver of land at the top of Deansgate, hence its elongated plan, and was proposed in July 2003, with construction starting a year later. At a height of 554 feet, it is the tallest building in Manchester and tallest outside London in the United Kingdom. It was described by the Financial Times as "the UK's first proper skyscraper outside London". From 2006 to 2018, the skyscraper was the tallest building in Manchester and outside London in the United Kingdom.
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Bridgewater Hall

Lower Mosley Street, M2 3WS, Manchester
The Bridgewater Hall is a concert venue in Manchester city centre, England. It cost around £42 million to build and currently hosts over 250 performances a year. The hall is home to The Hallé orchestra, and is the primary concert venue for the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra. The building sits on a bed of 280 springs, which help reduce external noise. The venue is named after the Third Duke of Bridgewater who commissioned the eponymous Bridgewater Canal that crosses Manchester, although the hall is situated on a specially constructed arm of the Rochdale Canal.
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Manchester Opera House

3 Quay Street, M3 3HP, Manchester
The Opera House in Quay Street, Manchester, England, is a 1,920-seater commercial touring theatre that plays host to touring musicals, ballet, concerts and a Christmas pantomime. It is a Grade II listed building. The Opera House is one of the main theatres in Manchester, England. The Opera House and its sister theatre the Palace Theatre, Manchester on Oxford Street are operated by the same parent company, Ambassador Theatre Group.
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Hiking

St John's Gardens

Lower Byrom Street, Manchester, M3 4AP, UK
St John's Gardens is an open space in Liverpool, England, to the west of St George's Hall. The gardens are part of the William Brown Street conservation area, and comprise one of the two open spaces within Liverpool's World Heritage Site. It has been a Green Flag site since 2003. The gardens contain ornamental flower beds, and memorials to notable people of the city.
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Relaxing

Whitworth Park

Whitworth Park is a public park in south Manchester, England, and the location of the Whitworth Art Gallery. To the north are the University of Manchester's student residences known as "Toblerones". It was historically in Chorlton on Medlock but is now included in the Moss Side ward. The park, of some 18 acres opposite Manchester Royal Infirmary, was opened in 1890 on land known as Potters Field. The park was leased to the Corporation of Manchester by the Whitworth Trustees in October 1904 on a 1000-year lease for a nominal annual rent of £10.
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Shopping

King Street

King Street is one of the major arteries of the Manchester City Center, England. Formerly the center of the northwestern banking sector, it was increasingly dominated by expensive stores.
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Market Street, Manchester

Market Street is one of the major trade routes in Manchester, England. It runs from the junction with Piccadilly and Mosley Street, near Piccadilly Gardens, to the east to St. Mary's Gate at the intersection with Exchange Street and New Cathedral Street to the west. St. Mary's Gate then continues to Deansgate. Other major roads are High Street, Corporation Street, Cross Street and Fountain Street.
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Arndale Centre

Market Street, Manchester, M4 3AQ, UK
Manchester Arndale is a large shopping mall in Manchester, England. The center was built in the 1970s, when many other cities built large shopping centers. Manchester Arndale is the largest of a chain of Arndale centers built throughout the United Kingdom during the 1960s and 1970s. It was built in phases between 1972 and 1979 at a cost of £ 100m. The center was redeveloped after the bombing of Manchester in 1996. The shopping center has a retail space of almost 1,500,000 m², making it the third largest shopping center in the city center. It is one of the largest shopping malls in the UK with 41 million visitors a year in front of the Trafford Center, which attracts 35 million.
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Afflecks

52 Church Street, M4 1PW, Manchester
Afflecks is an indoor market in Manchester, England, in the city's Northern Quarter on the junction of Church Street/Tib Street and Dale Street with Oldham Street. Dozens of independent stalls, small shops and boutiques operate in the one building. The building was once occupied by a department store called Affleck and Brown as a store and office space, hence the name.
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Corn Exchange

Exchange Square, M4 3TR, Manchester, GB
Corn Exchange, Manchester is a grade II listed building in Manchester, England. The building was originally used as a corn exchange and was previously named the Corn & Produce Exchange, and subsequently The Triangle. Following the IRA bomb in 1996 it was renovated and was a modern shopping centre till July 2014. The building was recently sold to Aviva investors and has been re-developed into a dining destination with 17 food outlets.
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The Printworks

27 Withy Grove, M4 2BS, Manchester
The Printworks is an urban entertainment venue offering a cinema, clubs and eateries, located on the corner of Withy Grove and Corporation Street in Manchester city centre, England.
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Sightseeing

Manchester Town Hall

Town Hall, Albert Square, Manchester, Lancashire M60 2LA, UK
Manchester Town Hall is a Victorian neo-Gothic city building in Manchester, England. It is the ceremonial headquarters of the Manchester City Council and houses a number of local government agencies. The building is opposite Albert Square to the north and St. Peter's Square to the south, with Manchester Cenotaph opposite the southern entrance. The Town Hall was completed in 1877 to plans by the architect Alfred Waterhouse. The building is home to offices and grand ballrooms, including the Great Hall, adorned with Ford Madox Brown's stunning Manchester murals that illustrate the city's history. The entrance and the sculpture hall contain busts and statues of influential figures such as Dalton, Joule and Barbirolli. The exterior is dominated by the bell tower, which rises to 280 feet and houses Great Abel, the clock of the bell.
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Manchester Cathedral

Victoria Street, Manchester, M3 1SX, UK
Manchester Cathedral, formally the Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George, in Manchester, England, is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Manchester, seat of the Bishop of Manchester and the parish church. It is located on Victoria Street in Manchester city center. The main body of the cathedral is in the perpendicular gothic style. James Stanley was responsible for commissioning late-medieval wooden furniture, including the pulpit, choir stalls, and nave worn by angels with gilded instruments. The medieval church was extensively renovated, restored and expanded in the Victorian era and after bomb damage in the 20th century. The cathedral is one of fifteen listed buildings in Manchester.
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John Rylands Library

150 Deansgate, M3 3EH, Manchester
The John Rylands Library is a late Gothic neo-gothic style building on Deansgate in Manchester, England. The library, opened to the public in 1900, was founded by Enriqueta Augustina Rylands in memory of her husband John Rylands. The John Rylands Library and the University of Manchester Library merged in July 1972 into the John Rylands University Library of Manchester; Today it is part of the University of Manchester Library. Special collections built by both libraries were increasingly concentrated in the Deansgate building. Among the most notable collections believed to be among the largest in the United Kingdom are medieval illuminated manuscripts and early European prints, including a Gutenberg Bible, the second largest print by William Caxton, and the largest collection of Aldine editions Press of Venice.
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Imperial Chinese Archway

An amazing piece of beautifully decorated architecture, the only archway of its kind in Europe.
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Albert Square

Albert Square, M26 Manchester, UK
Albert Square is a public space in the center of Manchester, England. It is dominated by its tallest building, the Grade II listed Manchester Town Hall, a Victorian building by Alfred Waterhouse. Other smaller buildings from the same period surround it, many of which are listed. The square contains a number of monuments and statues, the largest of which is the Albert Memorial, a memorial to Prince Albert, Prince Consort of Queen Victoria. The named after the prince square was created in 1863-67 as a place for the memorial. Work on the town hall began in 1868 and was completed in 1877.
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Manchester Central Library

St Peters Square, M2 5PD, Manchester
Manchester Central Library is the city's main library and information service in Manchester, England. The building was designed by E. Vincent Harris and built between 1930 and 1934. The shape of the building, a columnar portico attached to a rotunda dome construction, is loosely derived from the Pantheon in Rome. At its opening, one critic wrote: "This is a way of making one believe in the eternal applicability of the classic canon." The library building is listed in Class II *. A four-year renovation and renovation project began in 2010. The Central Library reopened on March 22, 2014.
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Castlefield Urban Heritage Park

Castlefield is an inner city conservation area of Manchester in North West England. The conservation area which bears its name is bounded by the River Irwell, Quay Street, Deansgate and the Chester Road. It was the site of the Roman era fort of Mamucium or Mancunium which gave its name to Manchester. It was the terminus of the Bridgewater Canal, the world's first industrial canal, built in 1764; the oldest canal warehouse opened in 1779. The world's first passenger railway terminated here in 1830, at Liverpool Road railway station and the first railway warehouse opened here in 1831. The Rochdale Canal met the Bridgewater Canal at Castlefield in 1805 and in the 1830s they were linked with the Mersey and Irwell Navigation by two short cuts. In 1848 the two viaducts of the Manchester, South Junction and Altrincham Railway crossed the area and joined each other, two further viaducts and one mainline station Manchester Central railway station followed.
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Chetham's Library & School of Music

Long Millgate, M3 1SB Manchester, UK
Chetham's Library in Manchester, England, is the oldest free public reference library in the United Kingdom. Chetham's Hospital, which contains both the library and Chetham's School of Music, was established in 1653 under the will of Humphrey Chetham, for the education of "the sons of honest, industrious and painful parents", and a library for the use of scholars. The library has been in continuous use since 1653. It operates as an independent charity, open to readers and visitors free of charge. The hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 9am-12:30pm and 1:30pm-4:30pm. Anyone can access the library, however readers and researchers must make an appointment at least one business day in advance. The library holds more than 100,000 volumes of printed books, of which 60,000 were published before 1851. They include collections of 16th- and 17th-century printed works, periodicals and journals, local history sources, broadsides and ephemera.
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Victoria Baths

Hathersage Road, M13 0FE, Manchester
Victoria Baths is a Grade II* listed building, in the Chorlton-on-Medlock area of Manchester, in northwest England. The Baths opened to the public in 1906 and cost £59,144 to build. Manchester City Council closed the baths in 1993 and the building was left derelict. A multimillion-pound restoration project began in 2007. As of 2009, the building is on English Heritage's Heritage at Risk Register.
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Traveling

Manchester (MAN)

Manchester Airport Olympic House Manchester M90 1QX United Kingdom
Manchester Airport is an international airport located in Ringway, Manchester, England, 7.5 nautical miles southwest of Manchester city center. In 2016, it was the third largest airport in the UK in terms of number of passengers and the busiest outside of London. The airport consists of three passenger terminals and a goods terminal and is the only airport in the UK, with the exception of London Heathrow Airport, which operates two runways over 2,800 meters long.
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Manchester Piccadilly Railway Station

Manchester Piccadilly is the main train station in Manchester, England. Opened as Store Street in 1842, it was renamed Manchester London Road in 1847 and Manchester Piccadilly in 1960. Located on the southeast side of Manchester city center, it offers intercity and long distance services to national destinations such as London, Birmingham and Bristol, Southampton, Wales and Scotland, and local and regional services to destinations in the north of England including Liverpool, Leeds, Sheffield, Newcastle and York. It is one of 19 major train stations managed by National Rail Infrastructure Network Rail. The station was built by the Manchester and Birmingham Railway Company, designed by its chief engineer, civil engineer George W. Buck.
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Manchester Chorlton Street Coach Station

Manchester Chorlton Street coach station or Manchester Central coach station is a InterCity bus and coach station in Manchester, England. The station is operated by National Express Coaches, who provide the majority of services.
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Manchester Victoria

Manchester Victoria station in Manchester, England is a combined mainline railway station and Metrolink tram stop. Situated to the north of the city centre on Hunts Bank, close to Manchester Cathedral, it adjoins Manchester Arena which was constructed on part of the former station site in the 1990s. Opened in 1844, Victoria is Manchester's third busiest railway station after Piccadilly and Oxford Road and the second busiest station managed by Northern after Oxford Road. The station hosts local and regional services to destinations in Northern England, such as Blackburn, Rochdale, Bradford, Leeds, Newcastle, Huddersfield, Halifax, Wigan, Southport, Blackpool and Liverpool using the original Liverpool to Manchester line. Most trains calling at Victoria are operated by Northern, except for TransPennine Express services from Liverpool to Newcastle and during engineering works, when some trains are diverted from Piccadilly.
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Ordsall Chord

The Ordsall Chord is a short railway line in the Ordsall area of Salford, England, which links Manchester Piccadilly and Manchester Oxford Road to Manchester Victoria with the aim of increasing capacity and reducing journey times into and through Manchester. There are services that run between Manchester Oxford Road and Manchester Victoria then onwards to Leeds, Newcastle and Middlesbrough. A chord was proposed in the late-1970s and parliamentary powers for its construction were received in 1979, but the project was cancelled. Network Rail revived the proposal in 2010 as part of its Northern Hub proposal. Funding for its construction totalling £85 million was announced in the 2011 United Kingdom budget and construction commenced in 2016. It became operational on 10 December 2017.
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Ordsall Chord

The Ordsall Chord is a short railway line in the Ordsall area of Salford, England, which links Manchester Piccadilly and Manchester Oxford Road to Manchester Victoria with the aim of increasing capacity and reducing journey times into and through Manchester. There are services that run between Manchester Oxford Road and Manchester Victoria then onwards to Leeds, Newcastle and Middlesbrough. A chord was proposed in the late-1970s and parliamentary powers for its construction were received in 1979, but the project was cancelled. Network Rail revived the proposal in 2010 as part of its Northern Hub proposal. Funding for its construction totalling £85 million was announced in the 2011 United Kingdom budget and construction commenced in 2016. It became operational on 10 December 2017.
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Manchester Airport

Manchester Airport station is a railway and tram station at Manchester Airport, England which opened at the same time as the second air terminal in 1993. Manchester Metrolink tram services were extended to the airport in November 2014.
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Manchester Oxford Road

Manchester Oxford Road railway station is a railway station in Manchester, England, at the junction of Whitworth Street West and Oxford Street. It opened in 1849 and was rebuilt in 1960. It is the second busiest of the four stations in Manchester city centre. The station serves the southern part of Manchester city centre, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University, on the line from Manchester Piccadilly westwards towards Warrington, Chester, Llandudno, Liverpool, Preston and Blackpool. Eastbound trains go beyond Piccadilly to Crewe, Leeds and Sheffield.
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Manchester Airport

M90 3RR
Manchester Airport station is a railway and tram station at Manchester Airport, England which opened at the same time as the second air terminal in 1993. Manchester Metrolink tram services were extended to the airport in November 2014.
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Hotels

Hilton Manchester Deansgate

303 Deansgate, M3 4LQ, Manchester
Hilton Manchester Deansgate is a hotel in city centre of Manchester, United Kingdom. The hotel is housed within the 47-storey mixed-use skyscraper with the highest residential living space – Beetham Tower, also known as the Hilton Tower. The architect of the building, Ian Simpson bought the top two floors – 48th and 49th.
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Palace Hotel

M60 7HA, Manchester
The Principal Manchester, originally known as the Refuge Assurance Building or Refuge Building after the insurance company stands at the corner of Oxford Street and Whitworth Street in Manchester, England. The building was previously known as the Palace Hotel. The first phase of this Grade II* listed red brick and terracotta building was designed for the Refuge Assurance Company by Alfred Waterhouse and built 1891–1895. The inside was of Burmantofts faience and glazed brick. The ground floor was one enormous open business hall.It was extended, with a striking 217-foot tower, along Oxford Street by his son Paul Waterhouse in 1910–1912.
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Innside Manchester

First Street, M15 4RP, Manchester

Clayton Hotel

Outwood Lane, M90 4HL, Manchester

Premier Inn

7-11 Lower Mosley Street, M2 3DW, Manchester

Premier Inn

72 Dale Street, M1 2HR, Manchester, GB

The Portland

3-5 Portland Street, M1 6DP

Hatters @ Hilton Chambers

15 Hilton Street, M1 1JJ, Manchester, GB

Hatters Hostel on Newton St.