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Explore Carlisle

Carlisle is the county town of Cumbria. Historically in Cumberland, it is also the administrative centre of the City of Carlisle district in North West England. Carlisle is located at the confluence of the rivers Eden, Caldew and Petteril, 10 miles south of the Scottish border. It is the largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, and serves as the administrative centre for both Carlisle City Council and Cumbria County Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Carlisle was 71,773, with 100,734 living in the wider city. Ten years later, at the 2011 census, the city's population had risen to 75,306, with 107,524 in the wider city. The early history of Carlisle is marked by its status as a Roman settlement, established to serve the forts on Hadrian's Wall. During the Middle Ages, because of its proximity to the Kingdom of Scotland, Carlisle became an important military stronghold; Carlisle Castle, still relatively intact, was built in 1092 by William Rufus, and once…

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Carlisle,_Cumbria " , which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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Carlisle Castle

Castle Way, Carlisle CA3 8UR, UK
Carlisle Castle is situated in Carlisle, in the English county of Cumbria, near the ruins of Hadrian's Wall. The castle is over 900 years old and has been the scene of many historical episodes in British history. Given the proximity of Carlisle to the border between England and Scotland, it has been the centre of many wars and invasions. Today the castle is managed by English Heritage and is open to the public. The castle until recently was the administrative headquarters of the former King's Own Royal Border Regiment now county headquarters to the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment and a museum to the regiment is within the castle walls.
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Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery

Castle Street, Carlisle, Cumbria CA3 8TP, UK
The Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery is a museum in Carlisle, Cumbria, in England. Opened by the Carlisle Corporation in 1893, the original building is a converted Jacobean mansion, with extensions added when it was converted. At first the building contained the museum and also a library, an art school and a technical school.The building, including the extensions, is a Grade I listed building, and the wall, gates and railings in front of the house are separately Grade I listed.The two schools were moved in the 1950s and the library in 1986. The museum expanded into the city Guildhall in 1980 and with new space available from 1986 it underwent an extensive redevelopment over 1989-90 and again in 2000-01. Since May 2011 the museum has been an independent charitable trust, the Tullie House Museum and Art Gallery Trust. It is one of the three members of the Cumbria Museum Consortium, along with Lakeland Arts and the Wordsworth Trust.
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Sports

Brunton Park

Warwick Road, CA1 1LL, Carlisle, GB
Brunton Park is a football stadium and the home of Carlisle United F.C. It is situated in the city of Carlisle, Cumbria and has a certified capacity for the 2011/12 season of 18,202. The ground opened in 1909. Brunton Park's grandstand burned down in 1953 and the stadium flooded completely in 2005 and again in 2015. Brunton Park is split into four separate stands; Warwick Road End, East Stand, Main Stand and the Petteril End, which remains closed unless exceptionally large crowds are in attendance.
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Sightseeing

Birdoswald Roman Fort

Gilsland, Brampton, Cumbria, CA8 7DD, UK
Banna, now known as Birdoswald Roman Fort, was a fort, towards the western end of Hadrian's Wall, in the Roman province of Britannia. Today the site is occupied by a former farm called Birdoswald. As of 2005, it is the only site on Hadrian's Wall at which significant occupation in the post-Roman period has been proven, and it is subject to a long-term archaeological programme under the directorship of Tony Wilmott. It is one of the best preserved of the 16 forts along Hadrian's Wall. The fort is situated in a commanding position on a triangular spur of land bounded by cliffs to the south and east overlooking a broad meander of the River Irthing in Cumbria. In Roman times, the fort was known as Banna, reflecting the geography of the site.
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Carlisle Cathedral

7 Abbey Street, Carlisle, Cumbria CA3 8TZ, UK
The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, otherwise called Carlisle Cathedral, is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Carlisle. It is in Carlisle, in Cumbria, North West England. It was founded as an Augustinian priory and became a cathedral in 1133.Carlisle, because of heavy losses to its fabric, is the second smallest, of England's ancient cathedrals. Its notable features include some fine figurative stone carving, a set of medieval choir stalls and the largest window in the Flowing Decorated Gothic style in England.
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Bewcastle Castle (ruins)

Bewcastle Castle is a ruined castle in the parish of Bewcastle in the English county of Cumbria, only a few miles from the Scottish border.
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Bewcastle Cross

The Bewcastle Cross is an Anglo-Saxon cross which is still in its original position within the churchyard of St Cuthbert's church at Bewcastle, in the English county of Cumbria. The cross, which probably dates from the 7th or early 8th century, features reliefs and inscriptions in the runic alphabet. The head of the cross is missing but the remains are 14.5 feet high, and almost square in section 22 x 21 1/4 inches at the base. The crosses of Bewcastle and Ruthwell have been described by the scholar Nikolaus Pevsner as "the greatest achievement of their date in the whole of Europe".
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Traveling

Corby Bridge

Corby Bridge is a railway viaduct adjacent to and immediately East of Wetheral railway station at Wetheral, near Carlisle, in north-west England, begun in 1830 and completed in 1834. It is 660 feet long and 100 feet high, and has been Grade I listed since 1 April 1957. Built for the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway Company, it still carries the double-track Tyne Valley Line over the River Eden, and includes a cast iron footpath connecting Wetheral with Great Corby. This was added to the north face in 1851, because so many people were trespassing on the trackbed, in order to cross. Initially, a half-penny toll, each way, was charged, having risen to a penny by the time the station closed in 1956. Pedestrian passage is now free.
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Corby Bridge

Corby Bridge is a railway viaduct adjacent to and immediately East of Wetheral railway station at Wetheral, near Carlisle, in north-west England, begun in 1830 and completed in 1834. It is 660 feet long and 100 feet high, and has been Grade I listed since 1 April 1957. Built for the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway Company, it still carries the double-track Tyne Valley Line over the River Eden, and includes a cast iron footpath connecting Wetheral with Great Corby. This was added to the north face in 1851, because so many people were trespassing on the trackbed, in order to cross. Initially, a half-penny toll, each way, was charged, having risen to a penny by the time the station closed in 1956. Pedestrian passage is now free.
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Hotels

Dalston Hall

CA5 7JX, Dalston
Dalston Hall is a fortified country house at Dalston in Cumbria. It is a Grade II* listed building.
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Warwick Hall

CA4 8PG, Warwick-On-Eden

The Halston

20-34 Warwick Road, CA1 1DN, Carlisle

Premier Inn

Junction 42, M6, CA4 0AD, Carleton

Farlam Hall

CA8 2NG, Brampton

Gretna Chase Hotel

DG16 5JB, Gretna

Gisland Spa Hotel

CA8 7AR, Gilsand

YHA Youth Hostel

Florrie's On The Wall Bunkhouse and B&B