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Explore Bristol

Bristol is a city and county in South West England with 459,300 inhabitants. The larger district has the tenth largest population in England. The urban area of ​​724,000 inhabitants is the eighth largest in the UK. The city is adjacent to North Somerset and South Gloucestershire, with the cities of Bath and Gloucester in the southeast and northeast respectively. South Wales is opposite the Severn Estuary. Iron age hill forts and Roman villas were built at the confluence of the Frome and Avon rivers. At the beginning of the 11th century, the settlement was called Brycgstow. Bristol received a royal statute in 1155 and was historically divided between Gloucestershire and Somerset until 1373, when it became a county. From the 13th to the 18th century, Bristol was one of London's three largest cities in terms of tax revenue after London. Bristol was surpassed by the rapid rise of Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool in the Industrial Revolution.

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SS Great Britain

Great Western Dockyard, BS1 6TY, Bristol
SS Great Britain is a museum ship and former passenger steamer that was advanced for its time. It was the longest passenger ship in the world from 1845 to 1854. It was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel for the transatlantic service of the Great Western Steamship Company between Bristol and New York. While other ships were made of iron or equipped with a screw propeller, Britain combined these features in a large ocean-going ship. She was the first iron steamer to cross the Atlantic in 1445, which she did in 1845. The ship is 322 feet long and has a displacement of 3,400 tons. It was powered by two inclined 2-cylinder direct-acting engines with two 88-inch 6-foot lift cylinders. She also received secondary sailing force. The four decks offered space for 120 men and 360 passengers, equipped with cabins, restaurants and boardwalks.
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Christmas Steps

Christmas Steps, Bristol BS1 5BS, United Kingdom
Christmas Steps is a historic street in the city center of Bristol, England.
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Bristol City Museum & Art Gallery

Queens Road, BS8 1RL, Bristol
Bristol Museum & Art Gallery is a large museum and art gallery in Bristol, England. The museum is located in Clifton, about 800 meters from the city center. As part of Bristol Culture, it is run by the Bristol City Council with no entry fee. It has the status of a museum granted by the national government for the protection of outstanding museums. The designated collections include: Geology, Eastern Art, and Bristol's History, including English Delftware. In January 2012, it became one of 16 major partner museums of the Arts Council England. The museum includes natural history departments as well as local, national and international archeology. The art gallery contains works from all eras, including many of internationally known artists as well as a collection of modern paintings by Bristol. In the summer of 2009, the museum housed an exhibition by Banksy with more than 70 works of art, including animatronics and installations. It is his biggest exhibition so far.
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See No Evil

Nelson Street, BS1 2HF Bristol, UK
See No Evil is a collection of public artworks by various graffiti artists on Nelson Street in Bristol, UK. The artwork was first created in August 2011 at an event that was Europe's largest street art festival at that time. It culminated with a block party. The road was largely repainted in a re-run event in 2012. The artworks include murals of various sizes and styles, some of which are high-rise buildings, including a 10-story office building. The work was created under a roadblock with scaffolding and aerial work platforms.
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We The Curious

Anchor Road, BS1 5DB, Bristol
We The Curious is a science center and charity in Bristol, England. The aim of the center is to "create a culture of curiosity". It features interactive, hands-on exhibits, produces shows and workshops for school and public audiences, and houses the UK's first 3D planetarium. As part of the charitable status, We The Curious has an extensive community program. On regular weekends all year round we are the curious hosts "Hello!" Weekends for communities that are currently underrepresented in their visitors and also provide community membership to charities and groups working in and for the community.
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Bristol Zoo

BS8 3HA, Bristol
Bristol Zoo is a zoo in the city of Bristol in South West England. The zoo's stated mission is to " biodiversity through breeding endangered species, conserving threatened species and habitats and promoting a wider understanding of the natural world". The mammal collection at the zoo numbers around 300, representing 50 species, including: gorillas, Asiatic lions, pygmy hippos, and red pandas. Among species now on view at Bristol which are rare or absent in other UK zoos are Livingstone's fruit bats, aye ayes and quolls. The zoo's Twilight Zone was the first of its kind when it opened, there are many other indoor exhibits including an insect and reptile house and aquarium meanwhile outside there are several aviaries and a seal and penguin…
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Bristol City Museum & Art Gallery

BS8 1RL
Bristol Museum & Art Gallery is a large museum and art gallery in Bristol, England. The museum is situated in Clifton, about 0.5 miles from the city centre. As part of Bristol Culture it is run by the Bristol City Council with no entrance fee. It holds designated museum status, granted by the national government to protect outstanding museums. The designated collections include: geology, Eastern art, and Bristol's history, including English delftware. In January 2012 it became one of sixteen Arts Council England Major Partner Museums.The museum includes sections on natural history as well as local, national and international archaeology. The art gallery contains works from all periods, including many by internationally famous artists, as well a collection of modern paintings of Bristol. In the summer of 2009 the museum hosted an exhibition by Banksy, featuring more than 70 works of art, including animatronics and installations; it is his largest exhibition yet.
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The Red Lodge Museum

Park Row, BS1 5LJ, Bristol
The Red Lodge Museum is a historic house museum in Bristol, England. The original building was Tudor/Elizabethan, and construction began in 1579–1580, possibly to the design of Serlio. The main additional building phases are from the 1730s and the early 19th century.The Red Lodge is a free museum, managed as a branch of Bristol City Council. The museum is open from 1 April to 31 December on Saturdays, Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays, 11 am – 4 pm.
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Blue Reef Aquarium

Canon's Road, BS1 5TT, Bristol
The main draws of this aquarium are two huge ocean tanks with tunnels. There's also a sunken ship here, your kids will love it!
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Sports

Lido

Oakfield Place, BS8 2BJ
The Lido, Bristol is an historic lido situated in Oakfield Place in the Whiteladies Road area of Clifton, Bristol, England. Originally opened in approximately 1850, the pool eventually fell into disrepair and was closed in 1990. Despite being considered for demolition, the building was given Grade II* listed building status in 1998. It was purchased by the Bristol Glass Boat Company who restored the pool, for its reopening in November 2008.
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The Memorial Stadium

Filton Avenue, BS7 0AQ, Bristol, GB
The Memorial Stadium, also commonly known by its previous name of the Memorial Ground, is a sports ground in Bristol, England. It opened in 1921 dedicated to the memory of local rugby union players killed during the First World War, and was the home of Bristol until they moved to Ashton Gate in 2014. It is currently the home stadium of Bristol Rovers F.C., who moved there in 1996.
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St Werburgh's Church

Mina Road, Bristol BS2 9YT, UK
St Werburgh's Church, Bristol, is a former church, now a climbing centre in the St Werburghs area of central north-east Bristol, England. It has been designated on the National Heritage List for England as a Grade II* listed building.The area became known as St Werburghs when the church was relocated from Corn Street to Mina Road in 1879.
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Shirehampton Park Golf Club

Have a great game of golf at this 18-hole course. It is suitable for beginners as well as for advanced players.
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Restaraunts

St Nicholas Market

The Exchange, Old City, Bristol BS1 1JQ, UK
St. Nicholas Market is a market on Corn Street, Bristol, England, on the Stock Exchange in the city center of Bristol. This is also home to the Bristol Farmers' Market, the Nails Market and the Slow Food Market, all of which are in front of the stock exchange.
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Cabot Circus

Glass House, Bristol BS1 3BX, UK
Cabot Circus is a shopping mall in Bristol, England. It is located next to Broadmead, a shopping district in Bristol city center. The development area Cabot Circus includes shops, offices, a cinema, a hotel and 250 apartments. It covers a total area of ​​139,350 m2, including 92,900 m2 of retail outlets and leisure facilities. It opened in September 2008 after a ten-year planning and construction project with a volume of £ 500 million.
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Clifton Village

Clifton is both a suburb of Bristol, England, and the name of one of the city's thirty-five council wards. The Clifton ward also includes the areas of Cliftonwood and Hotwells. Other parts of the suburb lie within the ward of Clifton East. Notable places in Clifton include Clifton Suspension Bridge, Clifton Cathedral, Clifton College, The Clifton Club, Bristol Zoo, Goldney Hall and Clifton Down.
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Corn Exchange

The Exchange is a Grade I listed building built in 1741–43 by John Wood the Elder, on Corn Street, near the junction with Broad Street in Bristol, England. It was previously used as a corn and general trade exchange but is now used as offices and St Nicholas Market. The Exchange underwent major building work in 1872, including roofing over the courtyard, and again in the early 1900s when the City Valuer's Department moved to the building. Since World War II the external clock tower has been removed and the roof lowered. Outside the building are four bronze tables dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, known as "nails," at which merchants carried out their business.
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Arnolfini

16 Narrow Quay, BS1 4QA
Arnolfini is an international arts centre and gallery in Bristol, England. It has a programme of contemporary art exhibitions, artist's performance, music and dance events, poetry and book readings, talks, lectures and cinema. There is also a specialist art bookshop and a café bar. Educational activities are undertaken and experimental digital media work supported by online resources. A number of festivals are regularly hosted by the gallery. Arnolfini is funded by Bristol City Council and Arts Council England, with some corporate and individual supporters. The gallery was founded in 1961 by Jeremy Rees, and was originally located in Clifton. In the 1970s it moved to Queen Square, before moving to its present location, Bush House on Bristol's waterfront, in 1975. The name of the gallery is taken from Jan van Eyck's 15th-century painting, The Arnolfini Portrait.
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Watershed

1 Canons Road, BS1 5TX, Bristol
Watershed opened in June 1982 as the United Kingdom's first dedicated media centre. Based in former warehouses on the harbourside at Bristol, it hosts three cinemas, a café/bar, events/conferencing spaces, the Pervasive Media Studio, and office spaces for administrative and creative staff. It occupies the former E and W sheds on Canon's Road at Saint Augustine's Reach, and underwent a major refurbishment in 2005.
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Turtle Bay

8 Broad Quay, BS1 4DA, Bristol
A restaurant serving Caribbean meals such as fried squids, duck rolls or Jamaican fried bait. A very exotic experience.
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The Coronation Tap

7-8 Sion Place, BS8 4AX
The Coronation Tap is a ciderhouse, a pub that specialises in serving cider, in the Clifton suburb of the English city of Bristol. The Coronation Tap, or Cori to regulars, has existed under that name for at least two hundred years. It is at least thirty years older than the Clifton Suspension Bridge and was described in 1806 as "a beerhouse with cottage adjoining".The most popular drink is the strong Exhibition Cider, served in half pints. The pub is popular with students within the city.
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Piccolino

3 Philadelphia Street, BS1 3BZ, Bristol
Delicious and fresh Italian meals are on the menu in this restaurant. The homemade pasta, tasty cheese and seafood are just dreamy.
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Going Out

Old Market

Old Market is a Conservation Area of national significance, to the east of the city centre in Bristol, England. Old Market Street and West Street form the central axis of the area, which is approximately bounded by New Street and Lawfords Gate to the north, Trinity Road and Trinity Street to the east, Unity Street and Waterloo Road to the south and Temple Way Underpass to the west. Old Market Street is an ancient market place which developed immediately outside the walls of Bristol Castle on what was for many centuries the main road to London; on market days Jacob Street and Redcross Street, which run parallel to Old Market Street, took the through traffic. Old Market’s Pie Poudre Court, which dealt out summary justice to market-day offenders, was not formally abolished until 1971.
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Bristol Hippodrome

Saint Augustines Parade, BS1 4UZ, Bristol
The Bristol Hippodrome is a theatre located in The Centre, Bristol, England, with seating on three levels giving a capacity of 1,951. It frequently features West End theatre shows when they tour the UK, as well as regular visits by Welsh National Opera and an annual pantomime.
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Colston Hall

Colston Street, BS1 5AR, Bristol
Colston Hall is a concert hall and Grade II listed building on Colston Street, Bristol, England. It is owned by Bristol City Council and named after the slave trader and merchant Edward Colston, who founded a school at this location in the early 18th century. Since 2011, management of the hall is undertaken by Bristol Music Trust. The hall first opened as a concert venue in 1867, and became a popular place for classical music and theatre. In the mid-20th century, wrestling matches were in strong demand, while in the late 1960s it developed into one of the most important rock music venues in Britain. The hall has been redeveloped several times, and was gutted by two fires in 1898 and 1945, though the original Bristol Byzantine foyer has survived. A major refurbishment, adding an extra wing, opened in 2009 and redevelopment of the cellars is planned by 2019.
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The Old Duke

45 King Street, BS1 4ER, Bristol
The Old Duke is a jazz and blues venue and pub situated on King Street in the English city of Bristol. Live music is played every night of the week, admission is free and it hosts an annual Jazz Festival. The pub's name is a reference to the classic American jazz musician Duke Ellington, though the pub has actually held the same name since it was built, and most likely previously referred to The Duke of Cumberland.The pub dates from about 1775, an entry appearing in Sketchley's Bristol Directory of that year, for Lewis Jenkins, victualler, Lodging & Board, 'Duke of Cumberland', 44 King Street,and is a grade II listed building.The pub's heritage lies with traditional, New Orleans inspired jazz.
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Royal West of England Academy Of Art

Queen's Road, BS8 1PX, Bristol
The Royal West of England Academy is an art gallery located in Clifton, Bristol, near the junction of Queens Road and Whiteladies Road.
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Bristol Old Vic

King Street, BS1 4ED, Bristol
Bristol Old Vic is a British theatre company based at the Theatre Royal, Bristol. The present company was established in 1946 as an offshoot of the Old Vic in London. It is associated with the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, which became a financially independent organisation in the 1990s. Bristol Old Vic runs a popular, and highly successful Young Company for young people aged 7–25.The Theatre Royal, the oldest continually-operating theatre in the English-speaking world, was built during 1764–66 on King Street in Bristol.
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The Cube

4 Princess Row, BS2 8JD
The Cube Microplex is a social art experiment existing in the form of a cinema and event venue in Bristol, England. It operates as a non-profit cooperative. Since opening in 1998 it has hosted artistic and cultural events including films and music performances as well as providing a focal point for the local artistic community. The building includes a 108-seat theatre/cinema as well as a bar serving local and ethical products. All participants provide their involvement in the project voluntarily and are unwaged.
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Seven Stars

Thomas Lane, BS1 6JG, Bristol
Seven Stars is a historic pub on Thomas Lane, Bristol, England; it was built in the 17th century and is a grade II listed building.One of the earliest references to the pub is in the Bristol Record Office. It mentions Sir John Hawkins who, whilst buying what was to become the Georges Brewery, acquired the lease in 1694 from the Saunders family brewing dynasty "...a half tenement, the sign of the Seven Stars, St Thomas Lane"."Michael Jaine, victualler" held "The Starrs" "in accordance with his father's will" in the latter part of the seventeenth century. Michael Jayne was the son of William Jayne of St. Thomas, innholder, who died in 1666. Abraham Sanders married Margaret Jayne, daughter of William Jayne, and Abraham Sanders was the administrator of William's will. Michael Jayne, innholder of St. Thomas, was deceased by 1672, when an inventory of his estate was taken.
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Thekla

The Grove, BS1 4RB, Bristol
Thekla is a former cargo ship moored in the Mud Dock area of Bristol's Floating Harbour, England. The ship was built in Germany in 1958 and worked in the coastal trades. In 1982 the ship was bought by Ki Longfellow-Stanshall, the wife of Vivian Stanshall, refitted, and brought to Bristol in 1983 as the Old Profanity Showboat. It was used as a theatre to showcase music of every sort, including cabaret, comedy, plays, musicals, and poetry events. The ship also contained an art gallery. The living quarters were home for Vivian, Ki, their daughter, Silky Longfellow-Stanshall, and Ki's daughter, Sydney Longfellow, as well as a few key personnel.
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Hiking

Cabot Tower

BS1 5RR
Cabot Tower is a tower in Bristol, England, in a public park on Brandon Hill between the city center, Clifton and Hotwells. It is a listed building. The tower was built in the 1890s on the occasion of the 400th anniversary of John Cabot's journey from Bristol to land, which later became Canada. The public access to the viewing platforms on the spire was blocked from 2007 to 2011 due to repairs.
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Queen Square

Queen Square is a 4 acre Georgian square in the center of Bristol, England. After the destruction of the 1831 uprising, Queen Square was withdrawn in the second half of the 19th century, threatened by a planned central station, and halved in the 1930s by a two-lane road. By 1991, 20,000 vehicles including regular buses crossed the square every day and more than 30% of the buildings were empty. In 1999 Queen Square was rebuilt after a successful bid for the National Lottery in about 1817. Buses were diverted, the two-lane road was removed, forecourts and railings were restored, and Queen Square reopened as a splendid public space surrounded by high-quality commercial accommodation.
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Castle Park

Castle Park is a public open space in Bristol, England, managed by the Bristol City Council. It is bounded by Floating Harbor and Castle Street in the south, Lower Castle Street in the east and Broad Weir, Newgate and Wine Street in the north. Its western border is less obvious and controversial, perhaps because the area around the High Street and St. Mary le Port Church, although not part of the park and always intended for development, is often concurrent with the park. The park was completed and opened on September 30, 1978 and occupies most of the location where Bristol's main shopping district was located. During World War II, much of the area was severely damaged by lightning, and the remainder was subsequently demolished. The ruined tower of St. Mary-le-Port church faces west of the park, surrounded by rundown financial office buildings.
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Avon Gorge

The Avon Gorge is a 1.5-mile long gorge on the River Avon in Bristol, England. The gorge runs south to north through a limestone ridge 1.5 miles west of Bristol city centre, and about 3 miles from the mouth of the river at Avonmouth. The gorge forms the boundary between the unitary authorities of North Somerset and Bristol, with the boundary running along the south bank. As Bristol was an important port, the gorge formed a defensive gateway to the city. On the east of the gorge is the Bristol suburb of Clifton, and The Downs, a large public park. To the west of the gorge is Leigh Woods, the name of both a village and the National Trust forest it is situated in. There are three Iron Age hill forts overlooking the gorge, as well as an observatory. The Clifton Suspension Bridge, an icon of Bristol, crosses the gorge.
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Blaise Castle Estate

Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9JN, UK
Blaise Castle is a folly built in 1766 near Henbury in Bristol, England. The castle sits within the Blaise Castle Estate, which also includes Blaise Castle House, a Grade II* listed 18th-century mansion house. The folly castle is also Grade II* listed and ancillary buildings including the orangery and dairy also have listings. Along with Blaise Hamlet, a group of nine small cottages around a green built in 1811 for retired employees, and various subsidiary buildings, the parkland is listed Grade II* on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of special historic interest in England. The site has signs of occupation during the Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age and Roman periods. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries the site was sold. In 1766 Thomas Farr commissioned Robert Mylne to build the sham castle in Gothic Revival style.
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University of Bristol Botanic Garden

The Holmes, Stoke Park Road, Stoke Bishop, Bristol BS9 1JG, UK
The University of Bristol Botanic Garden is a Botanical garden in Bristol, England. The garden moved to its current site in Stoke Bishop having previously been at two other sites in the city. The 4,500 species of plants are displayed in collections relating to evolution, Mediterranean, local flora and rare natives and finally useful plants.
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Durdham Down

Durdham Down is an area of public open space in Bristol, England. With its neighbour Clifton Down to the southwest, it constitutes a 400-acre area known as The Downs, much used for leisure including walking, jogging and team sports. Its exposed position makes it particularly suitable for kite flying. Durdham Down is the part of the Downs north of Stoke Road..
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Relaxing

Clifton Down

Clifton Down is an area of public open space in Bristol, England, north of the village of Clifton. With its neighbour Durdham Down to the northeast, it constitutes the large area known as The Downs, much used for leisure including walking and team sports. Clifton Down is the part of the Downs south of Stoke Road.
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Castle Park, Bristol

Castle Park is a public open space in Bristol, England, managed by Bristol City Council. It is bounded by the Floating Harbour and Castle Street to the south, Lower Castle Street to the east, and Broad Weir, Newgate and Wine Street to the north. Its western boundary is less obviously defined and has been the subject of controversy, perhaps because the area around High Street and St Mary le Port Church, though not part of the park and always intended for development, is often considered at the same time as the park. The park was completed and opened on 30 September 1978, and occupies most of the site which had contained Bristol's main shopping area. Much of this area was heavily damaged in the Blitz during the Second World War, and that which remained was subsequently demolished. The ruined tower of St Mary-le-Port church stands to the west of the park, surrounded by derelict financial office buildings.
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Castle Park

Castle Park is a public open space in Bristol, England, managed by Bristol City Council. It is bounded by the Floating Harbour and Castle Street to the south, Lower Castle Street to the east, and Broad Weir, Newgate and Wine Street to the north. Its western boundary is less obviously defined and has been the subject of controversy, perhaps because the area around High Street and St Mary le Port Church, though not part of the park and always intended for development, is often considered at the same time as the park. The park was completed and opened on 30 September 1978, and occupies most of the site which had contained Bristol's main shopping area. Much of this area was heavily damaged in the Blitz during the Second World War, and that which remained was subsequently demolished. The ruined tower of St Mary-le-Port church stands to the west of the park, surrounded by derelict financial office buildings.
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Shopping

Park Street

Park Street is a major shopping street in Bristol, England that connects the city center with Clifton. It is part of the A4018. The Park Street building was opened in 1761 and was the earliest example of Bristol, which was uniformly tiered terraces on the hillside. The road climbs steeply northwards from College Green and joins Park Row near the southern tip of the Clifton Delta. If you look up the street, you have a dramatic view of the Wills Memorial Building.
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Corn Street

Corn Street, along with Broad Street, Wine Street and High Street, is one of the four cross streets that met at Bristol High Cross, the heart of Bristol, England, when it was a medieval walled city. From this intersection, Corn Street and its future extension Clare Street leads approximately 325 meters southwest to The Center. Corn Street contains many historic buildings. For centuries it was the center of commerce and administration of Bristol, but in recent years has increasingly turned to the market for shopping, leisure and accommodation.
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Broadmead

Broadmead is a street in the central area of Bristol, England, which has given its name to the principal shopping district of the city.
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Whiteladies Road

Whiteladies Road is a main road in Bristol, England. It runs north from the Victoria Rooms to Durdham Down, and separates Clifton on the west side from Redland and Cotham on the east. It forms part of the A4018. Significant buildings on Whiteladies Road include: Broadcasting House, offices and studios of the British Broadcasting Corporation;
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Brislington Food & Wine

Brislington is an area in the south east of the city of Bristol, England. It is on the edge of Bristol and 10 miles from Bath. The Froome, locally nowadays called the Brislington Brook, runs through the area in the woodlands of Nightingale Valley. Brislington houses the HTV West Studios on Bath Road and this is situated next to the historic Arnos Vale Cemetery which is undergoing restoration after a lengthy public and newspaper campaign.
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Sightseeing

Clifton Suspension Bridge

The Clifton Suspension Bridge is a world-famous suspension bridge that spans the Avon Gorge and the River Avon, connecting Clifton in Bristol with Leigh Woods in North Somerset. Since its opening in 1864, it has been a toll bridge. the income from which the funds are provided for maintenance. The bridge was built to a design by William Henry Barlow and John Hawkshaw according to an earlier design by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and contributed by Sarah Guppy. It is a Grade II listed building and part of the B3129 road. The idea of ​​building a bridge over the Avon Gorge was created in 1753. Originally a stone bridge was planned, followed by a wrought-iron structure. In 1831, the attempt to build Brunel's design was interrupted by the riots in Bristol, and the revised version of his designs was built after his death and completed in 1864.
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Bristol Cathedral

College Green, BS1 5TJ, Bristol
Bristol Cathedral, the Cathedral of the Saints and Undivided Trinity, is the Church of England Cathedral in Bristol, England. It was founded in 1140 and consecrated in 1148. Originally it was the abbey of St. Augustine. After the dissolution of the monasteries, it was in 1542 the seat of the newly created Bishop of Bristol and the Cathedral of the new diocese of Bristol. It is a listed building. At the eastern end of the church are 12th-century fabrics and the Elder Lady Chapel, added at the beginning of the 13th century.
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Bristol Harbour

Bristol Harbor is the harbor in the city of Bristol, England. The port covers an area of ​​70 hectares. It has existed since the 13th century, but was expanded to its present form at the beginning of the 19th century by installing floodgates at a flood point in the Avon in the center of the city and creating a bypass for the river. It is often referred to as a floating port because the water level remains constant and is not affected by the tidal state of the river. Netham Lock in the east of Bristol is the offshore border of the port. Behind the lock is a crossroads: on one arm, the navigable River Avon leads upstream to Bath and on the other arm is the tidal river Avon. The first 1 mile of the floating harbor, downstream from the Netham Lock to the Totterdown Basin, is an artificial channel known as the Feeder Canal, while the tidal river Avon follows its original route.
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King Street

King Street is a 17th-century street in the historic city center of Bristol, England. The road is just south of the old city wall and was built in 1650 to build the Town Marsh, which was then located between the South or Marsh Wall and Avon. The north side was first developed and the south side 1663, when the street was named after Charles II. The section of the city wall is a planned antique monument.
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St Mary Redcliffe

12 Colston Parade, BS1 6RA, Bristol
St. Mary Redcliffe is an Anglican parish church in the Redcliffe district of Bristol, England. The church is just a short walk from Bristol Temple Meads Station. The church building was built between the 12th and 15th centuries and has been a place of Christian worship for over 900 years. The church is known for the beauty of its gothic architecture and is classified by Historic England as a Grade II listed building.
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University of Bristol

Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TH, UK
The University of Bristol is a red brick research university in Bristol, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1909, although, like the University of West England and the University of Bath, it can be traced back to the Merchant Venturers Technical College, founded in 1595 by the Society of Merchant Venturers. Bristol's most important predecessor, University College, has been in existence since 1876. Bristol consists of six academic faculties, consisting of several schools and departments, offering over 200 undergraduate courses, most of which are located in the Tyndall Park area of ​​the city.
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The Clifton Observatory

Litfield Place, BS8 3LT, Bristol
Clifton Observatory is a former mill now used as an observatory located in Clifton Down near the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol, England. The building was built by the Society of Merchant Venturers in 1766 as a windmill for corn and later converted to snuff grinding when it became known as "The Snuff Mill". This was damaged by fire on October 30, 1777, when the sails turned during a storm and brought the equipment to a standstill. It had been 52 years before it disappeared, until William West, an artist, rented the old mill for 5 shillings a year as a studio. In 1977, Merchant Venturers sold the observatory to Honorbrook Inns; However, they were obliged to restrict the access of the Camera Obscura, whose property was ...
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The Centre

The Center is a public open space in the central area of ​​Bristol, England, created by covering the river Frome. The northern end of the center, known as Magpie Park, is bounded on the western edge of Colston Avenue. The southern end is a larger paved area bounded by St. Augustine's Parade to the west, Broad Quay to the east, and St. Augustine's Reach to the south, halved in 2016 by the extension of Baldwin Street. The center is managed by the Bristol City Council. The name "The Center" seems to have been transferred to the area since the mid-twentieth century. Before, from 1893, when the upper part of St. Augustine was covered, it was known as Tramways Center and Magpie Park. The center is neither the historic or bourgeois center of Bristol, nor is it a major shopping district. However, it is an important public transport hub and cultural destination.
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Temple Church

Temple Church, also known as Holy Cross Church, is a ruined church in Redcliffe, Bristol, England. It is on the site of a previous, round church of the Knights Templar, which they built on land granted to them in the second quarter of the 12th century by Robert of Gloucester. In 1313 the Knights Hospitaller acquired the church, following the suppression of the Templars, only to lose it in 1540 at the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries. By the early 14th century, the church served as the parish church for the area known as Temple Fee. From around the same time, the rebuilding of the church on a rectangular plan started. This was completed by 1460, with the construction of a leaning west tower. The church was the scene of the exorcism of George Lukins conducted by Methodist and Anglican clergy in 1788.The church was bombed and largely destroyed in the Bristol Blitz. It is a Grade II* listed building, owned by the Diocese of Bristol.
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Traveling

Bristol Ferry Boats

44 The Grove, Bristol BS1 4RB, UK
Bristol Ferry Boats is a brand of water bus services operating around Bristol Harbour in the centre of the English city of Bristol, using a fleet of distinctive yellow and blue painted ferry boats. The services were formerly owned by the Bristol Ferry Boat Company, but are now the responsibility of Bristol Community Ferry Boats, a community interest company that acquired the fleet of the previous company. The company operates scheduled ferry services, along with educational and public boat cruises and private hire of boats. Scheduled services operate on two routes linking Bristol city centre to Temple Meads railway station and Hotwells, serving 17 landing stages throughout the length of the harbour, including one at Brunel's famous SS Great Britain. Services are provided on a commercial basis without subsidy and are subject to competition. The company's principal competitor is Number Seven Boat Trips, who operate over similar routes.
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Clifton Down

Clifton Down railway station is on the Severn Beach line and serves the district of Clifton in Bristol, England. It is 3.9 miles from Bristol Temple Meads. Its three letter station code is CFN. The station has two platforms, each serving trains in one direction only. As of 2015 it is managed by Great Western Railway, which is the third franchise to be responsible for the station since privatisation in 1997. They provide all train services at the station, mainly a train every forty minutes in each direction between Bristol Temple Meads and Avonmouth. The station was opened in 1874 by the Great Western and Midland Railways as part of the Clifton Extension Railway, designed to connect the port of Avonmouth to the national rail network. The station had a large gothic revival building on the Bristol-bound platform, with smaller passenger facilities on the opposite platform and a goods yard beyond.
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Dowry Square

Dowry Square is in the Hotwells area of Bristol. It was laid out in 1727 by George Tully and building continued until 1750. The houses are three-storeyed with attics, simply detailed and with channelled pilasters to the party walls.In 1799 Dr Thomas Beddoes opened a laboratory in Dowry Square as the Pneumatic Institution where he worked with Sir Humphry Davy.
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Hotels

Bristol Marriott Royal Hotel

College Green, BS1 5TA, Bristol

Hampton by Hilton Bristol City Centre

Bond Street, BS1 3LQ, Bristol, GB

Rodney Hotel

4 Rodney Place, BS8 4HY, Bristol

Bristol International Student Centre

45 Woodland Road, BS8 1UT, Bristol

Finzels Reach

Counterslip, BS1 6BX

Saco Apartments

Broad Quay, BS1 4AW, Bristol

Victoria Square Hotel

29-30 Victoria Square, BS8 4EW, Bristol

Bristol Backpackers Youth Hostel

17 Saint Stephen's Street, BS1 1EQ

Rodney Hotel

4 Rodney Place, BS8 4HY, Bristol